The Official Water Appreciation Thread

chica

v2.0
2-2.5 liters a day is my suggestion!

"The benefit of drinking water in elimination of body wastes and toxins

Our organs are made of cells. The cells are made of and live in a water solution. Our blood also is mostly water and serves to dissolve, process and transport nutrients, and eliminate waste materials. With lack of water in our system, the blood becomes thick and saturated (meaning, it will not be able to flow properly). The wastes and toxins are stored in the area around the cells while waiting to be washed away. Over time, these accumulate and begins to resemble a toxic waste dump. Since the cells cannot have the proper oxygenation and nutrition, they begin to change in form and function in order to survive. The end stage of this process results in the cells not resembling normal cells at all, and they continue living by means of fermentation rather than the normal oxidative mechanisms. This causes all sorts of diseases (including cancer).

The benefit of drinking water in maintaining the body Ph balance in order to prevent and cure disease.

The aging process is basically the accumulation of acidic wastes built up within the body. The nutrients that we deliver to our cells burn with oxygen and become acidic wastes after giving energy to our body. The body tries its best to get rid of these acidic wastes through urine and perspiration. So the more water we take into our system, the better (and more efficient) our body dispels these acidic wastes.

The benefit of drinking water in lubricating internal organs and joints

Water keeps our organs and joints moist. This permits the passage of nutrients and wastes between the joints and blood vessels and the rest of the body. Arthritis - is a signal of water shortage in the painful joint. It can affect the young as well as the old. The use of painkillers does not cure the problem, but exposes the person to further damage from pain medications.

The benefit of drinking water for skin health

Skin health is just the reflection of our internal health. Any dermatologist can tell what part of your body is affected just by looking at your skin. Hydration and detoxification starts inside and continues to the outside of your skin. So, keeping a beautiful healthy looking skin is a side benefit of drinking water.

The benefit of drinking water for eye health

Recently I had an eye examination. The doctor told me that our cornea is made up of 80% water. Working long hours on the computer makes the eyes dry. Just closing the eyes for a few seconds every hour and blinking frequently allows liquid from the tear glands to moisturize and lubricate the cornea. He also recommended regular drinking of water for good eye health.

The benefit of drinking water to lose weight

Incredible as it may seem, water is quite possibly the single-most important catalyst in losing weight and keeping it off. Although most of us take for granted, water may be the only true “magic potion” for permanent weight loss.

Water suppresses the appetite naturally and helps the body metabolize stored fat. Studies have shown that a decrease in water intake will cause fat deposits to increase, while an increase in water intake can actually reduce fat deposits.

Here’s why: The kidneys can’t function properly without enough water. When they don’t work to capacity, some of their load is dumped onto the liver. One of the liver’s primary functions is to metabolize stored fat into usable energy for the body. But if the liver has to do some of the kidney’s work it can’t operate at full throttle. As a result, it metabolizes less fat more fat remains stored in the body and weight loss stops.

The overweight person needs more water than a thin one. Larger people have larger metabolic loads. Since we know that water is the key to fat metabolism, it follows that the over-weight person needs more water.

The benefit of drinking water in muscle tone

Water helps to maintain proper muscle tone by giving muscles their natural ability to contract and by preventing dehydration. It also helps to prevent the sagging skin that usually follows weigh loss — shrinking cells are buoyed by water which plumps the skin and leaves it clear, healthy and resilient.

The benefit of drinking water in constipation

Water can help relieve constipation. When the body gets too little water, it siphons what it needs from internal sources. The colon is one primary source. Result? Constipation. But when a person drinks enough water, normal bowel function usually returns."


THE BREAKTHROUGH POINT

When the body gets the water it needs to function optimally, its fluids are perfectly balanced. When this happens, you have reached the “breakthrough point.” What does this mean?
* Endocrine-gland function improves.
* Fluid retention is alleviated as stored water is lost.
* More fat is used as fuel because the liver is free to metabolize stored fat.
* Natural thirst returns.
* There is a loss of hunger almost overnight.
If you stop drinking enough water, your body fluids will be thrown out of balance again, and you may experience fluid retention, unexplained weight gain and loss of thirst. To remedy the situation you’ll have to go back and force another “breakthrough.”

The problem is that, though many decide to increase their water intake, very few stick with it. It’s understandable. During the first few days of drinking more water than your body is accustomed to, you’re running to the bathroom constantly*. This can be very discouraging, and it can certainly interfere with an otherwise normal day at work. It seems that the water is coming out just as fast as it’s going in, and many people decide that their new hydration habit is fruitless.

Do take heart, though. What is really happening is that your body is flushing itself of the water it has been storing throughout all those years of “survival mode”. It takes a while, but this is a beautiful thing happening to you. As you continue to give your body all the water it could ask for, it gets rid of what it doesn’t need. It gets rid of the water it was holding onto in your ankles and your hips and thighs, maybe even around your belly. You are excreting much more than you realize. Your body figures it doesn’t need to save these stores anymore; it’s trusting that the water will keep coming, and if it does, eventually, the flushing (of both the body and the potty) will cease, allowing the human to return to a normal life. It’s true. This is called the “breakthrough point.”


* I experienced this and I got scared, because at the time I didn't know what was happening! However, a week or so later I go to the toilet just a couple of times a day although I drink the same (insane :D) amount of water
 

The Cat's Mother

Unmentionable
2-2.5 liters a day is my suggestion!

"The benefit of drinking water in elimination of body wastes and toxins

Our organs are made of cells. The cells are made of and live in a water solution. Our blood also is mostly water and serves to dissolve, process and transport nutrients, and eliminate waste materials. With lack of water in our system, the blood becomes thick and saturated (meaning, it will not be able to flow properly). The wastes and toxins are stored in the area around the cells while waiting to be washed away. Over time, these accumulate and begins to resemble a toxic waste dump. Since the cells cannot have the proper oxygenation and nutrition, they begin to change in form and function in order to survive. The end stage of this process results in the cells not resembling normal cells at all, and they continue living by means of fermentation rather than the normal oxidative mechanisms. This causes all sorts of diseases (including cancer).

The benefit of drinking water in maintaining the body Ph balance in order to prevent and cure disease.

The aging process is basically the accumulation of acidic wastes built up within the body. The nutrients that we deliver to our cells burn with oxygen and become acidic wastes after giving energy to our body. The body tries its best to get rid of these acidic wastes through urine and perspiration. So the more water we take into our system, the better (and more efficient) our body dispels these acidic wastes.

The benefit of drinking water in lubricating internal organs and joints

Water keeps our organs and joints moist. This permits the passage of nutrients and wastes between the joints and blood vessels and the rest of the body. Arthritis - is a signal of water shortage in the painful joint. It can affect the young as well as the old. The use of painkillers does not cure the problem, but exposes the person to further damage from pain medications.

The benefit of drinking water for skin health

Skin health is just the reflection of our internal health. Any dermatologist can tell what part of your body is affected just by looking at your skin. Hydration and detoxification starts inside and continues to the outside of your skin. So, keeping a beautiful healthy looking skin is a side benefit of drinking water.

The benefit of drinking water for eye health

Recently I had an eye examination. The doctor told me that our cornea is made up of 80% water. Working long hours on the computer makes the eyes dry. Just closing the eyes for a few seconds every hour and blinking frequently allows liquid from the tear glands to moisturize and lubricate the cornea. He also recommended regular drinking of water for good eye health.

The benefit of drinking water to lose weight

Incredible as it may seem, water is quite possibly the single-most important catalyst in losing weight and keeping it off. Although most of us take for granted, water may be the only true “magic potion” for permanent weight loss.

Water suppresses the appetite naturally and helps the body metabolize stored fat. Studies have shown that a decrease in water intake will cause fat deposits to increase, while an increase in water intake can actually reduce fat deposits.

Here’s why: The kidneys can’t function properly without enough water. When they don’t work to capacity, some of their load is dumped onto the liver. One of the liver’s primary functions is to metabolize stored fat into usable energy for the body. But if the liver has to do some of the kidney’s work it can’t operate at full throttle. As a result, it metabolizes less fat more fat remains stored in the body and weight loss stops.

The overweight person needs more water than a thin one. Larger people have larger metabolic loads. Since we know that water is the key to fat metabolism, it follows that the over-weight person needs more water.

The benefit of drinking water in muscle tone

Water helps to maintain proper muscle tone by giving muscles their natural ability to contract and by preventing dehydration. It also helps to prevent the sagging skin that usually follows weigh loss — shrinking cells are buoyed by water which plumps the skin and leaves it clear, healthy and resilient.

The benefit of drinking water in constipation

Water can help relieve constipation. When the body gets too little water, it siphons what it needs from internal sources. The colon is one primary source. Result? Constipation. But when a person drinks enough water, normal bowel function usually returns."


THE BREAKTHROUGH POINT

When the body gets the water it needs to function optimally, its fluids are perfectly balanced. When this happens, you have reached the “breakthrough point.” What does this mean?
* Endocrine-gland function improves.
* Fluid retention is alleviated as stored water is lost.
* More fat is used as fuel because the liver is free to metabolize stored fat.
* Natural thirst returns.
* There is a loss of hunger almost overnight.
If you stop drinking enough water, your body fluids will be thrown out of balance again, and you may experience fluid retention, unexplained weight gain and loss of thirst. To remedy the situation you’ll have to go back and force another “breakthrough.”

The problem is that, though many decide to increase their water intake, very few stick with it. It’s understandable. During the first few days of drinking more water than your body is accustomed to, you’re running to the bathroom constantly*. This can be very discouraging, and it can certainly interfere with an otherwise normal day at work. It seems that the water is coming out just as fast as it’s going in, and many people decide that their new hydration habit is fruitless.

Do take heart, though. What is really happening is that your body is flushing itself of the water it has been storing throughout all those years of “survival mode”. It takes a while, but this is a beautiful thing happening to you. As you continue to give your body all the water it could ask for, it gets rid of what it doesn’t need. It gets rid of the water it was holding onto in your ankles and your hips and thighs, maybe even around your belly. You are excreting much more than you realize. Your body figures it doesn’t need to save these stores anymore; it’s trusting that the water will keep coming, and if it does, eventually, the flushing (of both the body and the potty) will cease, allowing the human to return to a normal life. It’s true. This is called the “breakthrough point.”


* I experienced this and I got scared, because at the time I didn't know what was happening! However, a week or so later I go to the toilet just a couple of times a day although I drink the same (insane :D) amount of water

Thing is.... where's all the extra water going? I'm not noticing that I'm going to the loo more than I was before I upped my water, so I'm curious where the extra two or three pints a day are going. Okay, I'm sweating a bit off while cycling and presumably there's a higher water content in my poo, if the colon is so directly affected, but plumped up cells surely can't account for the rest considering I'm losing weight? What's going on, Dr Chica? :confused:
 

chica

v2.0
Oh, it's going out alright! Provided that you're past the "breakthrough point" and not retaining any water supplies in the intercellular space, the water you consume goes straight into the cells which need hydration, and the surplus leaves your body through exhaling and sweating (1.5 liters a day) and in urine (1 liter a day). Now, you have to count in the water you get from food, so if you drink 2.5 liters a day, you'll excrete more that 1 liter of urine - but probably not in case you sweat more than the ordinary lazy ass (me :p)
 

The Cat's Mother

Unmentionable
Oh, it's going out alright! Provided that you're past the "breakthrough point" and not retaining any water supplies in the intercellular space, the water you consume goes straight into the cells which need hydration, and the surplus leaves your body through exhaling and sweating (1.5 liters a day) and in urine (1 liter a day). Now, you have to count in the water you get from food, so if you drink 2.5 liters a day, you'll excrete more that 1 liter of urine - but probably not in case you sweat more than the ordinary lazy ass (me :p)

So I have wet breath. Like a spaniel. Okay then. :cool:

I need a wee.....
 
I love it but it needs to be fizzed up a tad...

start off in the morning with a pint of tea, woo best drink of the day (well in the morning eh?)

more tea top ups during the day...

night time yummy water mixed with malt/barley etc
here's one I prepared earlier

beerpint.jpg


you cannae whack water!

love

Grim
P.s. how many pints do I have to sup to get 2.25litres?
 
Between 3.5 and 4.4

http://www.metric-conversions.org/volume/

There's a gazillion of measures there! You people really need to adopt the metric system :eek:

Here's a tip: you can do bazillions of conversions using Google: just type something like "2.25 liters to pints" in the search box. Google even does currency conversion. :cool:

EDIT: I just checked whether they convert to smoots, and sure enough, they do! Must have an MIT grad or eleventy on staff there. :p
 
Last edited:
like this?

whatever happened to sodastreams, I just can't work out why they went bust? :D

'cept they made rollercola taste like the real thing! :eek:

love

Grim
 

Jukebox Jury

Retired
I love it but it needs to be fizzed up a tad...

start off in the morning with a pint of tea, woo best drink of the day (well in the morning eh?)

more tea top ups during the day...

night time yummy water mixed with malt/barley etc
here's one I prepared earlier

beerpint.jpg


you cannae whack water!

love

Grim
P.s. how many pints do I have to sup to get 2.25litres?

Grim
You beat me to it!
I have a T-shirt that says
''Save Tap Water - Drink More Beer''
:D:D

Jukebox Jury
 

Theo

Active Member
There was a review of a book about water in the NY Times on Sunday which provides some interesting material for people to discuss in a water appreciation thread.

(And I agree with the last sentence: Drink when you're thirsty.)


------------

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/15/b...l?_r=1&oref=slogin&ref=books&pagewanted=print

Tapped Out
By LISA MARGONELLI

To paraphrase an old axiom: You don’t buy water, you only rent it. So why did Americans spend nearly $11 billion on bottled water in 2006, when we could have guzzled tap water at up to about one ten-thousandth the cost? The facile answer is marketing, marketing and more marketing, but Elizabeth Royte goes much deeper into the drink in “Bottlemania: How Water Went on Sale and Why We Bought It,” streaming trends cultural, economic, political and hydrological into an engaging investigation of an unexpectedly murky substance. Partway through her undoctrinaire book, Royte, a lifelong fan of tap water, refills her old plastic water bottle, reflecting that “what once seemed so simple and natural, a drink of water, is neither. All my preconceptions about this most basic of beverages have been queered.” And by the end of the book she will have discarded the old plastic bottle too, but not the tap.

“Bottlemania” is an easy-to-swallow survey of the subject from verdant springs in the Maine woods to tap water treatment plants in Kansas City; from the grand specter of worldwide water wars, to the microscopic crustaceans called copepods, whose presence in New York’s tap water inspired a debate by Talmudic scholars about whether the critters violated dietary laws, and whether filtering water on the Sabbath constituted work. (Verdict: no and no.) Water is a topic that lends itself to tour-de-force treatment (the book “Cadillac Desert” and the movie “Chinatown” come to mind), as well as righteous indictments and dire predictions (“Thirst: Fighting the Corporate Theft of Our Water,” “When the Rivers Run Dry: Water — The Defining Crisis of the Twenty-First Century”). Where others are bold, “Bottlemania” is subversive, and after you read it you will sip warily from your water bottle (whether purchased or tap, plastic or not), as freaked out by your own role in today’s insidious water wars as by Royte’s recommended ecologically responsible drink: “Toilet to tap.”

Eww. Sorry. Let’s talk about those evil marketers. In 1987, Americans drank only 5.7 gallons of bottled water per person per year, but the cumulative impact of ad campaigns and the vision of Madonna fellating a bottle of Evian in “Truth or Dare” more than doubled consumption by 1997. In 2000 the chief executive of Quaker Oats bragged to analysts that “the biggest enemy is tap water.” By 2005, the enemy had become the consumer’s bladder; and in 2006, Pepsi, which owns Aquafina, spent $20 million suggesting that Americans “drink more water.” That year we drank 27.6 gallons each at a rate of about a billion bottles a week.

But marketing swings both ways. As quickly as bottled water became a symbol of healthy hyperindividualism — sort of an iPod for your kidneys — a backlash turned it into the devil’s drink. In 2006, the National Coalition of American Nuns came out against bottled water for the moral reason that life’s essential resource should not be privatized. New numbers surfaced: each year the bottles themselves require 17 million barrels of oil to manufacture, and, one expert tells Royte, “the total energy required for every bottle’s production, transport and disposal is equivalent, on average, to filling that bottle a quarter of the way with oil.” Mayors from San Francisco to New York suddenly became aware of the new symbolism of bottled water as a waste of taxpayer money, a diss of local tap water and a threat to the environment. Some canceled their city’s bottled water contracts. Chicago began taxing the stuff. And celebrities — among them Matt Damon and ... Madonna — started backing a dazzling array of water charities in support of domestic tap and African water supplies, associating themselves with the magical ur-brand of “pure water” just as marketers and Madonna did in the early ’90s.

Royte asks, perceptively, if the pro-bottle and anti-bottle movements aren’t cut from the same plastic: “Is it fashion or is it a rising awareness of the bottle’s environmental toll that’s driving the backlash? I’m starting to think they’re the same thing.” To Royte, the author of “Garbage Land,” righteousness requires a greater commitment.

She finds it in Fryeburg, Me., a town of 3,000 that is trying to stop Nestlé’s Poland Spring from sucking 168 million gallons of water a year out of the pristine aquifer buried under its piney woods. As Royte arrives the town is in an uproar, with neighbor pitted against neighbor and rumors of secret planning-board meetings and of dummy corporations. Fryeburg is a “perfect example of water’s shift from a public good to an economic force,” she observes. The locals are more blunt: “This is what a water war looks like.” Fryeburg bears the burden of living at the other end of the giant green Poland Spring pipe. Residents of nearby Hiram count 92 water tankers rolling through their town in one typical 24-hour period; they feel themselves under siege precisely because their watershed is clean, while 40 percent of the country’s rivers and streams are too polluted for swimming or fishing, let alone drinking. Fryeburg residents try to repel the water company. They demand tests, throw a Boston Tea Party by dumping Poland Spring in a local pond, take the issue to Maine’s Supreme Judicial Court and hold a town meeting straight out of Norman Rockwell. Here I wish Royte had devoted more energy to the narrative. The people of Fryeburg and their complaints feel tentative — a sketch where a portrait could have been. And although her writing always flows, I sometimes wished for something less utilitarian.

That comes, unexpectedly, as Royte stands at the edge of the Ashokan Reservoir in upstate New York. “Ignoring the bluish mountains that form its backdrop and the phalanx of security guards in our foreground,” she gazes “down onto the spillway which curves and drops like a wedding cake, in four tiers, before sending its excess through a granite passage,” supplying 1.2 billion gallons a day through 300 miles of tunnels and aqueducts and 6,200 miles of distribution mains. There once was grandeur in public works, and Royte captures the mythic heroism that inspired the politicians and engineers to build great reservoirs more than a century ago. Their outsize civic largesse makes our current culture of single-serving bottles feel decidedly crummy. But returning to public water’s golden age, if it’s possible, will not come cheap. Royte says the country needs to invest $390 billion in our failing water infrastructure by 2020.

By the time I finished “Bottlemania” I thought twice about drinking any water. Among the risks: arsenic, gasoline additives, 82 different pharmaceuticals, fertilizer runoff sufficient to raise nitrate levels so that Iowa communities issue “blue baby” alerts. And in 42 states, Royte notes, “people drink tap water that contains at least 10 different pollutants on the same day.” The privatization of pristine water is part of a larger story, a tragic failure to steward our shared destiny. And if you think buying water will protect you, Royte points out that it too is loosely regulated. And there is more — the dangers of pipes and of plastic bottles, the hazards of filters, and yes, that “toilet to tap” issue. But there is slim comfort: Royte says we don’t really need to drink eight glasses of water a day. Drink when you’re thirsty, an expert says. That’s refreshing.
 

Theo

Active Member
I've gotten into that ultra-trendy VitaminWater shit.
 

Theo

Active Member
n 2006, Pepsi, which owns Aquafina, spent $20 million suggesting that Americans “drink more water.” That year we drank 27.6 gallons each at a rate of about a billion bottles a week.

***

Royte says we don’t really need to drink eight glasses of water a day. Drink when you’re thirsty, an expert says. That’s refreshing.



Makes one wonder if all the experts who've told us to drink more water than we thirst for were just on the Aquafina/Deer Park/Evian payrolls!
 

Theo

Active Member
I've gotten into that ultra-trendy VitaminWater shit.


I guess I'm really, really trendy in my hydration, cuz I also turned away from spring water in plastic bottles in favor of filling an aluminum Sigg bottle with tasty Lake Erie tap water.

But yeah, that VitaminWater is charging hard at the Gatorade market! Coca-Cola bought VitaminWater and Pepsi owns Gatorade. The beverage wars are hard core! My local supermarket has a whole colorful wall of VitaminWater in all its flavors on display as you enter. Resistance is futile.
 
But yeah, that VitaminWater is charging hard at the Gatorade market! Coca-Cola bought VitaminWater and Pepsi owns Gatorade. The beverage wars are hard core! My local supermarket has a whole colorful wall of VitaminWater in all its flavors on display as you enter. Resistance is futile.

Coke always manages to out-market Pepsi. I like Gatorade, and I confess that I've never had VitaminWater, but I'm a Dr Pepper man myself. If it ain't got bubbles or alcohol, it ain't worth drinkin'.
 

Theo

Active Member
Coke always manages to out-market Pepsi. I like Gatorade, and I confess that I've never had VitaminWater, but I'm a Dr Pepper man myself. If it ain't got bubbles or alcohol, it ain't worth drinkin'.


I love Dr. Pepper, Coca-Cola, 7Up, and Squirt! (I also buy RC occasionally because I feel sorry for it - it tastes fine but is so squeezed out by Coke and Pepsi.) Pop may be bad for you if you drink too much, but it also, obviously, contains water. And VitaminWater contains sugar. I remember getting happy when I saw a doctor on a talk show say we shouldn't worry so much and Coke is an excellent source of water!

There was a big competition between Coke and Pepsi over Gatorade. Coke was about to buy it but negotiations broke down and Pepsi swooped in. Coke has been trying to fight back with Powerade, but most of the flavors of Powerade aren't as good, which is too bad cuz Powerade is less expensive. I love the Arctic Shatter flavor though!
 

Theo

Active Member
[The benefit of drinking water for skin health

Skin health is just the reflection of our internal health. Any dermatologist can tell what part of your body is affected just by looking at your skin. Hydration and detoxification starts inside and continues to the outside of your skin. So, keeping a beautiful healthy looking skin is a side benefit of drinking water.


I doubt that's true that skin health is just the reflection of our internal health (I think a lot of it is just because of the skin type you're born with), and I doubt it's true that drinking more water can solve many of the skin problems people have. Lots of healthy people, for example, have acne, and lots of unhealthy people have beautiful skin. I'd say a lot of skin problems are best addressed by what you do to your skin on the outside and have little to do with what you eat/drink, and if it's worse you gotta see a dermatologist. I'm not saying water isn't good for your skin (I'm sure it is), but this article kinda hypes up the benefits of drinking lots of water a bit too much.
 

hatfull

HIM-full
2-2.5 liters a day is my suggestion!

"The benefit of drinking water in elimination of body wastes and toxins

Our organs are made of cells. The cells are made of and live in a water solution. Our blood also is mostly water and serves to dissolve, process and transport nutrients, and eliminate waste materials. With lack of water in our system, the blood becomes thick and saturated (meaning, it will not be able to flow properly). The wastes and toxins are stored in the area around the cells while waiting to be washed away. Over time, these accumulate and begins to resemble a toxic waste dump. Since the cells cannot have the proper oxygenation and nutrition, they begin to change in form and function in order to survive. The end stage of this process results in the cells not resembling normal cells at all, and they continue living by means of fermentation rather than the normal oxidative mechanisms. This causes all sorts of diseases (including cancer).

The benefit of drinking water in maintaining the body Ph balance in order to prevent and cure disease.

The aging process is basically the accumulation of acidic wastes built up within the body. The nutrients that we deliver to our cells burn with oxygen and become acidic wastes after giving energy to our body. The body tries its best to get rid of these acidic wastes through urine and perspiration. So the more water we take into our system, the better (and more efficient) our body dispels these acidic wastes.

The benefit of drinking water in lubricating internal organs and joints

Water keeps our organs and joints moist. This permits the passage of nutrients and wastes between the joints and blood vessels and the rest of the body. Arthritis - is a signal of water shortage in the painful joint. It can affect the young as well as the old. The use of painkillers does not cure the problem, but exposes the person to further damage from pain medications.

The benefit of drinking water for skin health

Skin health is just the reflection of our internal health. Any dermatologist can tell what part of your body is affected just by looking at your skin. Hydration and detoxification starts inside and continues to the outside of your skin. So, keeping a beautiful healthy looking skin is a side benefit of drinking water.

The benefit of drinking water for eye health

Recently I had an eye examination. The doctor told me that our cornea is made up of 80% water. Working long hours on the computer makes the eyes dry. Just closing the eyes for a few seconds every hour and blinking frequently allows liquid from the tear glands to moisturize and lubricate the cornea. He also recommended regular drinking of water for good eye health.

The benefit of drinking water to lose weight

Incredible as it may seem, water is quite possibly the single-most important catalyst in losing weight and keeping it off. Although most of us take for granted, water may be the only true “magic potion” for permanent weight loss.

Water suppresses the appetite naturally and helps the body metabolize stored fat. Studies have shown that a decrease in water intake will cause fat deposits to increase, while an increase in water intake can actually reduce fat deposits.

Here’s why: The kidneys can’t function properly without enough water. When they don’t work to capacity, some of their load is dumped onto the liver. One of the liver’s primary functions is to metabolize stored fat into usable energy for the body. But if the liver has to do some of the kidney’s work it can’t operate at full throttle. As a result, it metabolizes less fat more fat remains stored in the body and weight loss stops.

The overweight person needs more water than a thin one. Larger people have larger metabolic loads. Since we know that water is the key to fat metabolism, it follows that the over-weight person needs more water.

The benefit of drinking water in muscle tone

Water helps to maintain proper muscle tone by giving muscles their natural ability to contract and by preventing dehydration. It also helps to prevent the sagging skin that usually follows weigh loss — shrinking cells are buoyed by water which plumps the skin and leaves it clear, healthy and resilient.

The benefit of drinking water in constipation

Water can help relieve constipation. When the body gets too little water, it siphons what it needs from internal sources. The colon is one primary source. Result? Constipation. But when a person drinks enough water, normal bowel function usually returns."


THE BREAKTHROUGH POINT

When the body gets the water it needs to function optimally, its fluids are perfectly balanced. When this happens, you have reached the “breakthrough point.” What does this mean?
* Endocrine-gland function improves.
* Fluid retention is alleviated as stored water is lost.
* More fat is used as fuel because the liver is free to metabolize stored fat.
* Natural thirst returns.
* There is a loss of hunger almost overnight.
If you stop drinking enough water, your body fluids will be thrown out of balance again, and you may experience fluid retention, unexplained weight gain and loss of thirst. To remedy the situation you’ll have to go back and force another “breakthrough.”

The problem is that, though many decide to increase their water intake, very few stick with it. It’s understandable. During the first few days of drinking more water than your body is accustomed to, you’re running to the bathroom constantly*. This can be very discouraging, and it can certainly interfere with an otherwise normal day at work. It seems that the water is coming out just as fast as it’s going in, and many people decide that their new hydration habit is fruitless.

Do take heart, though. What is really happening is that your body is flushing itself of the water it has been storing throughout all those years of “survival mode”. It takes a while, but this is a beautiful thing happening to you. As you continue to give your body all the water it could ask for, it gets rid of what it doesn’t need. It gets rid of the water it was holding onto in your ankles and your hips and thighs, maybe even around your belly. You are excreting much more than you realize. Your body figures it doesn’t need to save these stores anymore; it’s trusting that the water will keep coming, and if it does, eventually, the flushing (of both the body and the potty) will cease, allowing the human to return to a normal life. It’s true. This is called the “breakthrough point.”


* I experienced this and I got scared, because at the time I didn't know what was happening! However, a week or so later I go to the toilet just a couple of times a day although I drink the same (insane :D) amount of water
I drink at least 1 1/2 litres water a day. As a teacher, I'm talking all day long, and it's easy to get a throat infection or urinine infection through not drinking enough water. I try to stay away from coke and squash these days!
 
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