Little Black Sambo

mick ransommich

New Member
I read this book as a child in Primary School.

It was written in 1898, and it is still in print today - and widely available from big retailers such as Amazon..

http://www.amazon.com/Story-Little-...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1239901593&sr=8-1

Is this right or wrong?

littleblacksambo.jpg
 

CharethCutestory

Active Member
It sounds mint -

"The jolly and exciting tale of the little boy who lost his red coat and his blue trousers and his purple shoes but who was saved from the tigers to eat 169 pancakes for his supper".

169 pancakes!
 
We had a pancake house in my hometown in the 70s called Sambo's, named after the book. Those were more innocent times; we never gave any thought to the pictures of little black Sambo running around in the jungle. Of course, there were almost no black people in my town of 100,000, so maybe there weren't any complaints.

Is it wrong? Probably. It's not just because it caricatures black people; after all, there are innumerable kids' books that caricature white people. The difference is that there are even more books that don't caricature white folks, whereas you can't say the same thing for black people.
 
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Kilt Uncle

Active Member
It was probably good for its time....

..I am looking for a book that i read as a kid called - "Little Empire building honky bastard".

Maybe it was by J.R Hartley?...:eek:
 

j funk

.co.uk
What's the difference between that and a book about a blue boy? He doesn't rob anyone, or drive a BMW, or eat KFC in it.
 

mick ransommich

New Member
My Son is in Primary School, and he has read this book (it literally takes only two or three minutes to read).

He thought it was a funny story, and it would not occur to him that it could be construed as racist.

His School has many kids who are Indian, Pakistani, Polish, Chinese, Thai, etc... much more than when I was of a similar age to him. Sambo could have been from anywhere, his skin colour did not come into it.

I think there is a fear of the word 'Racist' among the older generation.. maybe the new kids will have more sense?
 
My Son is in Primary School, and he has read this book (it literally takes only two or three minutes to read).

He thought it was a funny story, and it would not occur to him that it could be construed as racist.

His School has many kids who are Indian, Pakistani, Polish, Chinese, Thai, etc... much more than when I was of a similar age to him. Sambo could have been from anywhere, his skin colour did not come into it.

I think there is a fear of the word 'Racist' among the older generation.. maybe the new kids will have more sense?

I agree with you....I see that with my kids as well.
 
My Son is in Primary School, and he has read this book (it literally takes only two or three minutes to read).

He thought it was a funny story, and it would not occur to him that it could be construed as racist.

His School has many kids who are Indian, Pakistani, Polish, Chinese, Thai, etc... much more than when I was of a similar age to him. Sambo could have been from anywhere, his skin colour did not come into it.

I think there is a fear of the word 'Racist' among the older generation.. maybe the new kids will have more sense?

I wonder whether my 4 year olds would notice. They're still fascinated by the teacher in their school who has "hot-dog hair" (i.e. dreadlocks). :D

I don't think my 6 year old would see anything wrong with it, either.
 

Moonbeam

Slackerbitch
Great book this!

Surprised Chareth hasn't ripped into it though for using the word sambo....
 
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j funk

.co.uk
I don't think anyone said there was a difference did they?

Did I say they did?

The debate about whether or not it's right passed smoothely.

Do you wan't me to say it is so you can say it isn't, though?
 
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