Morrissey A-Z: "Ammunition"

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
I'd (and let me start with "I" too) say, it's kind of reflecting one of these rare but wonderful days when everything is running smoothly, and you are in a constant flow of things.

So, here, in this song, it is most likely about someone, a writer?, experiencing a creative flow that is driving him or her forward, probably after a writer's block, and now s/he doesn't need any extra fuel (coffee, pills, etc) to rev up the engine and keep it going.

The "it" would be the creative energy found again.

One inconsistency remains though, which is the quotation, "We've never really been away". Makes me wonder who "we" is, the inner voices that drive the creative process forward? After all, it's or they are something that s/he had thought she lost forever, but now, that s/he decided not to waste any energy on fighting the arseholes any longer, the inner creative source is bubbling again freely.
 
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GirlAfraidWillNeverLearn

Well-Known Member
I'd (and let me start with "I" too) say, it's kind of reflecting one of these rare but wonderful days when everything is running smoothly, and you are in a constant flow of things.

So, here, in this song, it is most likely about someone, a writer?, experiencing a creative flow that is driving him or her forward, probably after a writer's block, and now s/he doesn't need any extra fuel (coffee, pills, etc) to rev up the engine and keep it going.

The "it" would be the creative energy found again.

One inconsistency remains though, which is the quotation, "We've never really been away". Makes me wonder who "we" is, the inner voices that drive the creative process forward? After all, it's or they are something that s/he had thought she lost forever, but now, that s/he decided not to waste any energy on fighting the arseholes, the inner creative source is bubbling again freely.
For me that "it" which "comes back on these salient days" has always been depression, this miserable feeling of utter dread that sometimes just tends to return seemingly out of nowhere. The voices saying "We've never really been away..." are a personification of it reminding you that this illness will always stay with you, even if you are able to forget about it during periods when you're feeling better.

It's crushing. One day you're feeling great, optimistic and content, the next you find yourself crying for no apparent reason and are unable to get out of bed. You're too busy dealing with yourself, everything is too much and even things and feelings that were all-consuming before (like "revenge" for example) don't seem to matter anymore.
The last verse perfectly encapsulates this sentiment.
 

born to mourn and yawn

Well-Known Member
For me that "it" which "comes back on these salient days" has always been depression, this miserable feeling of utter dread that sometimes just tends to return seemingly out of nowhere. The voices saying "We've never really been away..." are a personification of it reminding you that this illness will always stay with you, even if you are able to forget about it during periods when you're feeling better.

It's crushing. One day you're feeling great, optimistic and content, the next you find yourself crying for no apparent reason and are unable to get out of bed. You're too busy dealing with yourself, everything is too much and even things and feelings that were all-consuming before (like "revenge" for example) don't seem to matter anymore.
The last verse perfectly encapsulates this sentiment.
Yep, I see your point with the depression, which would give the song a sinister twist of course, reminding us that the glass is never half full but always half empty.

For me the tears s/he is crying are actually tears of relief, though, and the "it" or "we" leave a friendly echo in my ears like good old loyal friends, or the "resources", to use an analysts' words, that help you through times of crises. Sometimes these resources have to be rediscovered or reactivated, and for me this song is kinda celebrating this reactivation.

And before I have to go back to work, let me just say this, there is one dominant guitar in this song, which does not show any respect at all towards the singing voice. Dunno why, but they shouldve silenced it more.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
"I know what's expected of me now -
Veering Cliff-wards...."

 

Ryan

Von der Hand, in den Mund
Moderator
Subscriber
‘Tis my favourite Moz song next to I’m Not Sorry.
 

Verso

Well-Known Member
One of my favorites from Maladjusted, though I understand and accept the usual criticisms of this era's midtempo plodders. It's interesting to hear in a track like this how difficult it was for the band to adjust to the sound of the 90's. Without M's vocal, there's a real post-grunge Hootie & The Blowfish / Wallflowers / Matchbox 20 thing going on, which is certainly not a compliment.

All that said, I think of and hum this one to myself way more often than some of Morrissey's "better" songs. An underrated gem for sure.
 
C

carlislebaz

Guest
One of my favorites from Maladjusted, though I understand and accept the usual criticisms of this era's midtempo plodders. It's interesting to hear in a track like this how difficult it was for the band to adjust to the sound of the 90's. Without M's vocal, there's a real post-grunge Hootie & The Blowfish / Wallflowers / Matchbox 20 thing going on, which is certainly not a compliment.

All that said, I think of and hum this one to myself way more often than some of Morrissey's "better" songs. An underrated gem for sure.
What a review, Q ?
 
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